A television programme that helped you learn about something

With more and more ways of viewing TV available we now have access to a plethora of both good quality and inappropriate TV content. Does the program encourage children to ask questions, to use their imaginations, or to be active or creative?

Oftentimes, students can impart One of the positives about watching television is that — when it comes to certain types of shows — it has the ability to continually reinforce the traditional narrative structure.

As children watch sitcoms, they can see how exposition leads up to the challenges in the rising action, climax, falling action and resolution. They can potentially absorb this narrative structure thousands of times outside of their regular reading regime.

A television programme that helped you learn about something

Improve Reading Speed and Comprehension Yes, you read that correctly. Television can potentially improve reading skills and comprehension -- when used intentionally for this purpose.

Children in Finland have reportedly scored higher than most of the rest of the world in their reading skills. One reason experts point to is that Finnish children watch imported American shows. And the only way they can understand the dialogue is by reading the captions in their language.

The captions option is often ignored in households; however, the simple act of switching this on can expose children to viewing and reading simultaneously. You can encourage children to watch channels in other languages with the translated captions turned on.

Cultural Exposure Television can expose children to some really horrible things.

But this does not mean that these are the only things on television. When the right programs are viewed, television has an enormous potential for exposing children to aspects of the world they could never, ever access in their normal course of life.

A television programme that helped you learn about something

Background knowledge is essential — especially at early ages — for making sense of complex texts independently. And what better way to learn about the cultures, foods, customs, activities, histories, games, conflicts, current events, and so on throughout the world than to get regular doses of such knowledge through the visual and auditory means of the television?

And lots of it is very well done. But students who regularly view age-appropriate content designed to teach them information related to any field of interest — like history, astronomy, biology, mathematics, humanities, mechanics, etc. But our job as educators is not to automatically discredit anything: Instead, we are to show students how to think critically about any medium of communication and encourage them to make healthy, edifying decisions about what they choose to consume.

What do you tell students when you talk to them about television? How do you use videos, movies, shows, and clips in your classroom? Share your ideas with us in the comments below!

How Television Can Actually Help Learning

In addition to being National Board Certificated, he also sits as the District Leader for the Illinois Association of Teachers of English and serves as a school board member for a private school.part of something, for example, a sports game on television, that is immediately repeated, often more slowly, so that you can see a goal or another exciting or important moment again adapt something to change a book or play so that it can be made into a play, film, television programme, etc.

TV can act as a catalyst to get kids reading—following up on TV programs by getting books on the same subjects or reading authors whose work was adapted for the programs. Television can teach kids important values and life lessons.

Educational programming can develop young children’s socialization and learning skills. And what better way to learn about the cultures, foods, customs, activities, histories, games, conflicts, current events, and so on throughout the world than to get regular doses of such knowledge through the visual and auditory means of the television?

You can watch all the TV and movies you want and actually learn—no need to feel guilty anymore! TV and movies have something for everyone, whether it’s drama, romance, soap operas, nature documentaries or the news.

And what better way to learn about the cultures, foods, customs, activities, histories, games, conflicts, current events, and so on throughout the world than to get regular doses of such knowledge through the visual and auditory means of the television?

Ideal to learn British English while learning about a variety of topics! Want to learn British English? Sign up for a trial lesson with a Native English Teacher. Blue Peter, since Here’s one for the children Blue Peter is the longest-running children’s television program in the world.

30 TV Shows That Are Actually Educational | Edudemic